Signed & Dated 1986 Original Vintage Bronze Sculpture w/ Walnut Wood Base by Western Wildlife Artist Wally Shoop Titled “Spirit 1–Eagle Catcher” Displaying a Native American Indian Man Jumping Up From Underneath a Buffalo Hide to Capture an Eagle! - image 1 of 16

HERE’S A SIGNED, NUMBERED, AND DATED 1986 ORIGINAL VINTAGE BRONZE SCULPTURE ON WALNUT WOOD BASE CREATED BY STILLWATER, MINNESOTA / OSCEOLA, WISCONSIN WESTERN WILDLIFE ARTIST WALLY SHOOP (B. 1941-) TITLED “SPIRIT I – EAGLE CATCHER” THAT DISPLAYS A NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN MAN JUMPING UP FROM UNDERNEATH A BUFFALO HIDE TO CAPTURE THE LEG OF A FLYING EAGLE!

Dimensions: The overall dimensions of the bronze sculpture with the walnut wood base measure approximately twelve inches (12”) in height by just under six inches (5 7/8”) across the base. The bronze sculpture itself without the walnut wood base measures approximately ten and one half inches (10 1/2”) in height, five and one half inches (5 ½”) in width at its widest point, by three and one half inches (3 ½”) in depth at its deepest point.

Signature: Signed within the bronze at the bottom backside “W. Shoop ‘86” along with an edition number that looks to be “62 / 500” (but this is open to interpretation).

Condition: The bronze sculpture itself is in excellent and clean condition – absolutely beautiful! The walnut wooden base does have some condition issues. Some of the wood’s finish has worn off, the underside felt is missing, and there is a dry crack on the underside bottom that extends to one side. To this end, the walnut base really needs to be refinished with new felt on the underside bottom and it would be top-notch! Regardless, this is still a very nice example of a Wally Shoop’s modern American western bronze sculpture!

Domestic buyer pays calculated shipping for secure packing and USPS priority within the United States. I no longer ship internationally due to the high volume of scams taking place. Sorry.

(the following information is courtesy the website for PressPubs)

A work in progress: Wally Shoop sculpts from inspiration and life experience

By Jay Stephenson / Staff Writer
May 16, 2008

Upon first look at Wally Shoop's 15,000 square foot facility in Osceola that's full of his internationally recognized sculpture, it's hard to imagine his business began on a cart table in the corner of a basement.

The life of the Stillwater resident almost resembles the bronze fixtures he creates for international corporations, museums, and art collectors — a carefully crafted journey involving a lot of hard work along with a lot of inspiration.

Inside Shoop's warehouse lie hundreds of finished and unfinished sculptures slated for mass production. There's a shield emblem inlaid with sacred symbols he's sketching for a future sculpture to be sold to a casino, a globe and bottle sculpture he makes for the Coca-Cola program, and a wildlife sculpture he's creating for the Burlington-Northern Railroad company (he chooses a different animal each year).

Shoop's list of companies and people to which his sculptures are sold is almost as long as the different sculptures he's crafted over the years, most of which are drawn from his imagination inspired by his American Indian heritage and working-class upbringing. Aside from the many museums in which his work is displayed, his sculptures have been collected by former President Ronald Reagan, singer John Denver, actor Robert Redford, and several other famous people.

"When you stick around and do something for 40 years and have a strange name like Shoop, they're bound to remember you," he said.

Shoop's journey into the sculpting business began almost by accident. His early years were mostly spent making music in Missouri as a hillbilly rocker in the tradition of Carl Perkins and Elvis Presley. But it wasn't until later that he began sculpting more and more — not because his music career was failing but because his hobby was turning into a full-time career.

"I borrowed a soldering gun and welded electric copper wire together and made little figures that way," he said. "There was a gallery paint store upstairs and my future wife, who was working there, put some of them in and they started growing, and I played less music and made more sculpture."

Shoop's American Bronze Casting, LTD has been in Osceola for over 20 years. After moving out of White Bear Lake, he sculpted in and out of Stillwater before moving the business to Osceola as one of the first industries in town. He continues to live near Stillwater on 10 acres of land with his wife Kit (another artist) and several pets.

Artistry tends to run in the family for the Shoops. Both his sons, John and Wally Jr., work for American Bronze Casting and his other son James is a contract sculptor for Warner Brothers studios.

When Shoop was a child, he used to carve sculptures from sandstone he pulled out from a creek near his home in Rapid City, S.D. using just a screw driver. The early sculpting was Shoop's first venture into what has become a long history of creating not only original art work, but developing his own process and materials.

Shoop's Osceola studio is mainly configured from years of experimenting and finding better ways of making a finished product. Even after 40 years, he still finds new ways of creating a finished product.

"Now I'm really having fun working with my lasers," he said. "I've had a couple of lasers for the past two or three years, but I haven't been able to work with them or get to ‘em." With the lasers, Shoop has the ability to engrave logos and other markings, which he currently is using on gun stocks.

An example of Shoop's ingenuity can also be seen in how his lighting system inside the studio was crafted. When he didn't like the way all of his fluorescent lights turned on at the same time, he changed the outlets in the ceiling so he can use light only in a given work area or move the light to any part of the studio he desires in order to focus more on a project.

"I've learned everything about the actual physically of the work from being here," said Matt Dallman, a sculptor who has worked at American Bronze Casting for 10 years. Like many of Shoop's employees, Dallman has the ability to do several jobs like welding or painting. All nine workers at American Bronze Casting have been cross-trained to be able to do several different jobs, to eliminate monotony and keep one worker from carrying too much of a heavy work load.

For all his accomplishments, Shoop doesn't think of himself as a gifted artist in need of recognition.

"I don't get all artsy and say I've created this and that, and besides I'm a Christian and only God can create…so I just do it as a job," he said.

Though he also has a broad range of experiences to draw from, especially since growing up in a military family that traveled often, Shoop continues to find new sculptures to create, and new projects aside from his art. He is currently putting together another rock album that he may sell solely on the Internet.

"Everything your parents told you when you're growing up that we thought was bologna at the time is all true — that you'll get a reputation for doing a good job," he said. "Insisting on the highest quality… it's not just ethical, it's good business. You can't help but succeed."

ITEM ID
948
COLOR
Black, Bronze, Brown
GENRE
American Paintings, Drawings & Sculpture
MEDIA
Bronze, Wood
STYLE
Native American Art
THEME
Birds, Mythological, Western, Wildlife
ORIGIN
United States • American
AGE
Late 20th Century
ITEM TYPE
Vintage

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Signed & Dated 1986 Original Vintage Bronze Sculpture w/ Walnut Wood Base by Western Wildlife Artist Wally Shoop Titled “Spirit 1–Eagle Catcher” Displaying a Native American Indian Man Jumping Up From Underneath a Buffalo Hide to Capture an Eagle!

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